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Current Exhibits at the Indianapolis Museum of Art

Indianapolis Museum of Art

Indianapolis Museum of Art. AroundIndy.com staff photo, (c) 2011, all rights reserved.

By Candace Gwaltney
Indianapolis Museum of Art
http://www.imamuseum.org/

Current exhibitions on display at the Indianapolis Museum of Art include:

Ai Weiwei: According to What?
Closes July 21, 2013
11 a.m.–5 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Saturdays
11 a.m.–9 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays
Noon–5 p.m. Sundays
Allen Whitehill Clowes Special Exhibition Gallery
Public $12, IMA Member Free, Children (age 7-17) $6

Throughout his career, Ai Weiwei has offered insights into the interrelation between art, society, and individual experience. A major retrospective of the artist’s work, Ai Weiwei: According to What?, includes examples from the broad spectrum of the artist’s practice, from sculpture, photography, and video to site-specific architectural installations.

The exhibition presents new works from Ai Weiwei, including a sculpture made from steel rebar salvaged from schools destroyed during the 2008 Sichuan earthquake. The piece points to the inferior construction that caused the schools to collapse, while other buildings remained unscathed. Wenchuan Steel Rebar (2008 – 2012) is a powerful indictment of the Chinese government and a monumental reminder of the many young people who died in the earthquake.

Spencer Finch: Following Nature
Closes August 25, 2013
11 a.m.–5 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Saturdays
11 a.m.–9 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays
Noon–5 p.m. Sundays
Efroymson Family Entrance Pavilion
Free

Brooklyn-based artist Spencer Finch creates mixed-media installations, photographs and drawings that explore the limits of perception. Bringing together a scientific approach with a nuanced sense of poetics, Finch’s works call attention to various phenomena of the natural world through his investigations of light and color. Finch’s new installation for the IMA’s Efroymson Family Entrance Pavilion, Following Nature, is composed of an array of nearly 200 panels of glass suspended from the Pavilion’s ceiling, as a reinterpretation of Claude Monet’s iconic water garden in Giverny, France.

Gabor Peterdi
Through January 5, 2014
11 a.m.–5 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Saturdays
11 a.m.–9 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays
Noon–5 p.m. Sundays
Susan and Charles Golden Gallery
Free

This exhibition of 31 prints from the permanent collection features the work of master printmaker Gabor Peterdi (1915–2001). After beginning his career at Stanley William Hayter’s trendsetting Atelier 17 in Paris in 1934, he immigrated to New York at the onset of World War II and settled in the United States permanently, teaching first at Brooklyn Museum School of Art and then, until the end of his active life, at Yale. His independent prints are known for his mastery of complex intaglio techniques to create images that lie between abstraction and a surrealist investigation of the inner forces of nature. The Museum’s collection spans most of Peterdi’s career, and while the first prints were collected in the 1960s, most of the rest have been given over the past 20 years by Dr. Steven Conant.

MOLA: Kuna Needle Arts from the San Blas Islands, Panama
Closes July 14, 2013 (ends this Sunday)
11 a.m.–5 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Saturdays
11 a.m.–9 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays
Noon–5 p.m. Sundays
IMA Alliance Gallery
Free

In 2008, a collection of more than 350 molas was donated to the IMA by Irene Hollister, whose late husband, Paul Hollister – a writer, lecturer, painter and photographer – collected them in the 1960s and 1970s. Living in New Hampshire, Hollister sought out the IMA from her research of textile collections. The molas represent the textile arts of the Kuna Indians, the indigenous people of Panama and Columbia. The Kuna are famous for their bright, colorful and meticulously appliquéd textiles, which adorn the front and back of Kuna women’s blouses. MOLA: Kuna Needle Arts from the San Blas Islands, Panama includes a selection of about 50 of the finest molas from the Museum’s collection. Ranging in date from the early 1900s to the 1970s, the molas represent a myriad of motifs and designs.

Timeless Beauty
Closes July 14, 2013 (ends this Sunday)
11 a.m.–5 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Saturdays
11 a.m.–9 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays
Noon–5 p.m. Sundays
Frances Parker Appel Gallery
Free

“Timeless” can refer to something that is not restricted to a particular time period or age. It also describes things that are enduring, ageless, and unaffected by time. This exhibition looks at the Japanese genre called bijinga, or pictures of female beauties, from both vantage points, using prints from the last three decades of the 18th century through modern times. On one hand it allows one to compare which aspects artists from different periods seized upon as markers of feminine grace and attractiveness. On the other, it includes prints that have been damaged over time but still retain appreciable elements of beauty.

William Hogarth: The Painter Of Comic History
Closes August 4, 2013
11 a.m.–5 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Saturdays
11 a.m.–9 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays
Noon–5 p.m. Sundays
Steven Conant Galleries
Free

William Hogarth (1697–1764) was born in London and rarely strayed beyond its precincts. Overcrowded with a million people, London provided a limitless source of subjects for his observant eye and sharp wit. His print cycles, A Harlot’s Progress, A Rake’s Progress, and Marriage à la Mode, made Hogarth the artistic corollary of his contemporary literary satirists, Henry Fielding and Jonathan Swift. Drawn from the IMA’s permanent collection, this exhibition looks at 57 works produced by Hogarth over the course of 40 years.

Majestic African Textiles
Through March 2, 2014
11 a.m.–5 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Saturdays
11 a.m.–9 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays
Noon–5 p.m. Sundays
Gerald and Dorit Paul Galleries
Free

The new exhibition Majestic African Textiles presents a spectacular array of royal and prestige cloths, masking and ritual garments, and superbly beaded and embellished objects. Featuring more than 60 pieces drawn from the IMA’s permanent collection and augmented with a few major loans, the show highlights a significant and diverse group of richly patterned and elaborately decorated textiles from North and sub-Saharan Africa. Organized geographically and representing various African ethnic groups, Majestic African Textiles is the first exhibition at the IMA to gather together a large number of these prized pieces to showcase their splendor and significance.

Indiana By The Numbers
Through May 4, 2014
11 a.m.–5 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Saturdays
11 a.m.–9 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays
Noon–5 p.m. Sundays
Elma D. and Orville A. Wilkinson Gallery
Free

Commissioned in 1980 for the 20th anniversary of Melvin Simon & Associates (now Simon Property Group), Robert Indiana’s eight-foot-tall polychrome Numbers are iconic works from one of America’s most recognizable artists. The new exhibition Indiana by the Numbers traces the history of their design and fabrication, tells the story of their display before they were donated to the IMA in 1989, and provides a glimpse into their recent restoration and repainting by the IMA conservation department.

The Indianapolis Museum of Art is located at 4000 Michigan Road. For more information, visit http://www.imamuseum.org/, or call 317-923-1331.

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