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Spring Blooms Exhibit at Newfields (@NewfieldsToday)

March 29, 2022 Leave a comment

By Mattie Wethington
Newfields

INDIANAPOLIS, March 28, 2022—Open now through May 8 enjoy blooming bulbs and blossoms as they fill The Garden at Newfields during Spring Blooms presented by Wild Birds Unlimited. Rain or shine guests can expect to see an abundance of flowering blooms, dramatic foliage and spectacular floral displays around every turn indoors and out.

Signs of spring will emerge when 80,000 new bulbs and over 20,000 annuals blossom in The Garden. As the weather warms, hundreds of thousands of colorful blooms will come to life, culminating with a magnificent crescendo in mid-April. Alongside favorites like the River of Bulbs on the Lilly Allée, the newly completed Katharine B. Sutphin Border Garden invites all to explore new paths and meander amongst enhanced plantings. The Orchard Folly, a sheltered seating area created by Indianapolis based artist Cory Robinson debuts this season in the Tanner Orchard. 

“Newfields’ Spring Blooms celebration provides an incredible atmosphere and venue for families and friends to explore the spring season—and enjoy the birds!” said Jim Carpenter, CEO of Wild Birds Unlimited. “Wild Birds Unlimited is very proud to help present this wonderful outdoor experience to all who visit Newfields this spring.”

Spring is not complete without refreshments along the way. As you explore The Garden, don’t forget to stop by the Madeline F. Elder Greenhouse for a peek at some of the living jewels of the collection and pick up a beverage for your stroll. Construction for a new Beer Garden is well underway and will debut at its new permanent home near the Playhouse later in April. Our exclusive Sun King brew Among the Leaves is back for guests to enjoy, along with giant pretzels from Liter House. Non-alcoholic options will be available as well as several other beer, cider and wine offerings. After the grand reopening of the Beer Garden’s move to the Playhouse, the Greenhouse location will continue offering beverage options for guests, while the extended food and beverage offerings will move to the new pavilion. 

Continuing the joy of spring indoors, don’t miss the second annual Art in Bloom presented by Fifth Third Private Bank March 31 to April 3. During the vibrant spring event guests can explore breathtaking floral displays created by local and regional florists throughout the IMA Galleries. Also opening on March 26, guests can explore the newly reimagined Lower Level of the Lilly House, which now includes new interpretive elements and hands-on interactives that invite guests to explore the stories that make the Oldfields Estate the historic heart of Newfields. Throughout the season, stunning orchid displays from Newfields’ award-winning living collection will decorate the IMA Galleries, the Madeline F. Elder Greenhouse and the Lilly House. 

“We’re thrilled to be able to bring more blooms to campus every year in bright colors, interesting textures, and designs that use unique, inspired plant combinations,” said Jaime Frye, Assistant Curator of Living Collections.

Guests who are interested in learning about old favorites and new additions to Spring Blooms can access self-guided tours onsite by scanning a QR code. For a more person tour, join Chad Franer, The Tom and Nora Hiatt Director of Horticulture on a guided Director’s Tour at 6 p.m. on the last Thursday of the month from April through October, the schedule of tours can be found at discovernewfields.org/calendar/directors-tour.

Spring Blooms is included in general admission and advance tickets are required for all guests. Masks are optional for all guests indoors and outdoors attending the Newfields campus. We strongly encourage guests to wear masks indoors when social distancing is not possible. View FAQs at discovernewfields.org/visit

Spring Blooms is presented by Wild Birds Unlimited. Lead support for the River of Bulbs is provided by Catherine M. Turner.

“How People Make Things” Opens Jan. 22 @indianamuseum

December 22, 2021 Leave a comment

By Marc Allan
Indiana State Museum

INDIANAPOLIS – Every object in our world has a story of how it is made. How People Make Things, a new exhibit opening at the Indiana State Museum on Jan. 22, 2022, tells that story by linking familiar childhood objects to a process of manufacturing that combines people, ideas and technology.

The traveling exhibit from Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh is included with museum admission – $17 for adults, $16 for seniors 60 and older, $15 for college students and $12 for youth ages 3-17. For more information, visit indianamuseum.org or call (317) 232-1637. The exhibit closes on May 15, 2022.

How People Make Things, inspired by the factory tour segments from the Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood television series, offers hands-on activities using real factory tools and machines to create objects with four manufacturing processes – molding, cutting, deforming and assembly. Many common manufactured products help tell the story of how people, ideas and technology transform raw materials into finished products.  

How People Make Things offers hands-on activities using real factory tools and machines to create objects using four manufacturing processes – molding, cutting, deforming, and assembly. Visitors can use a die cutter to make a box and a horse, cut wax using different sculpting tools, deform a wire by taking a straight wire into a spring shape by winding it around the metal shaft, mold spoons using real melted wax, assemble a trolley and test your skills on the testing track.

“This exhibit brings children close to the real stuff, the nuts and bolts of how products are manufactured, which is very easy to feel removed from these days,” says Jane Werner, executive director of the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh. “Through his factory tours, Fred Rogers took complex issues and made them simple and direct so children could understand them and relate them to their own lives.  He made manufacturing fascinating and inspirational, and we continue that tradition with How People Make Things.”

The factory tour videos from the Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood television series featured in the exhibit depict the making of crayons, carousel horses, balls, stop lights, quarters, shoes, toy cars and toy wagons. 

“We’re excited to bring ‘How People Make Things’ to the Indiana State Museum,” said Bethany Thomas, vice president of programs and education engagement. “This exhibit celebrates the people, the manufacturing processes and the technology used to make objects we use every day.”

How People Make Things was created by Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh in collaboration with Family Communications, Inc. (FCI), the producer of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, and the University of Pittsburgh Center for Learning in Out-of-School Environments (UPCLOSE).  The exhibit was made possible with support from the National Science Foundation and The Grable Foundation.  

97th Annual Hoosier Salon Exhibit @indianamuseum

July 31, 2021 Leave a comment

97th Annual Hoosier Salon Exhibition Opens Aug. 21 at the Indiana State Museum

By Marc Allan
Indiana State Museum

INDIANAPOLIS – More than 100 artists from across Indiana will have their work displayed in the Indiana State Museum Aug. 21 through Oct. 24, 2021, as part of the 97th annual Hoosier Art Salon exhibition.

This year’s exhibit will feature 145 artworks in seven categories: figure; still life; abstract work; three-dimensional work; watercolor; portrait; and landscape. 

Seven artists are being featured for the first time: Teresa Altemeyer, Ann Bastianelli, Kalleen Chilcote and Lawrence Hunter, all from Indianapolis; Kevin O’Brien of Lafayette; Carrie Wright of Muncie; and  Willis “Bing” Davis of Dayton, Ohio. Davis was the juror for the 2020 Hoosier Salon.

The full list of artists is below.

All the work in the show is available for sale beginning August 20 through October 24 online at http://www.hoosiersalon.org.

“This is an exhibition that is rich in tradition and showcases the very best from across the state in a wide variety of media, technique and subject matter,” said Mark Ruschman, the Indiana State Museum and Historic Sites’ senior curator of art and culture. “This is a great opportunity for us to showcase the talent associated with Indiana. It provides the artists with exposure to an audience they may not reach otherwise. And there’s a level of prestige that comes along with exhibiting at a museum – and particularly their home state museum.”   

The Hoosier Salon legacy began in 1925 when the Daughters of Indiana opened the doors to the first exhibition of Indiana contemporary artists at Marshall Field and Company Galleries in Chicago. In 1942, the exhibit moved to downtown Indianapolis – first at the William H. Block (until 1977), then at L.S. Ayres and Company (1978-89). In 1990, the Hoosier Salon exhibit came to the Indiana State Museum, where it has been ever since except for a stint at the Indiana Historical Society from 2005-2010. 

“We feel like we’re the perfect venue for this exhibit, given what our mission is and our outreach across the state,” Ruschman said.

To be eligible for the competition, an artist must be a Hoosier Salon member and must have lived in Indiana for a minimum of one year at any point during his or her life.

On the Hoosier Salon’s website, www.hoosiersalon.org, the organization notes that 2021 is the Hoosier Salon’s 97th year “of serving Indiana’s artists and developing the creative community they need to thrive. We are and will always be the organization that truly represents Art by Indiana Artists. We are one of Indiana’s oldest and most respected visual arts groups, yet we are as current as our newest member and we intend to be around and healthy to turn 100 in 2025.”

The artists who will be featured in this year’s exhibit are:

Anna Afshar (Fishers), “What’s for Dinner”

Teresa Altemeyer (Indianapolis), “Blue”

Dan Annarino (West Lafayette), “Symbiotic History” and “Symbiotic Suburb”

Mason Archie (Indianapolis), “Serenity Number 5” and “Quilt Codes Series, Guide Me Home”

Donna Arnold (Carmel), “Lizzie in Florida” and “Alma Juliana”

Ann Bastianelli (Indianapolis), “Masked Man”

Jo Belmont (Indianapolis), “Veranda at El Lencero”

Robert Bratton (Carmel), “Farmed Out”

Peggy Breidenbach (Indianapolis), “Reaching” and “Joined”

Diane Breman (Spring, Texas), “A Horse of Course” 

Susan Brewer (Indianapolis), “Intervals In Time III” 

Jo Burkhard (Indianapolis), “Birds of an Unusual Feather” and “American Family”

William Carpenter (Marion), “Self-Inquiry”

John Michael Carter (Louisville, Kentucky), “February Evening”

Kalleen Chilcote (Indianapolis), “Beach Bums”

Judy Crawford (Demotte), “The Skylight”

Steven Creighton (Warsaw), “Still Life with Eggs”

Cindy Crofoot (Greendale), “Lost in the Melody”

Deborah Davis (Bloomington), “Evening Retreat – Covid Fantasy” and “Flying on the Brink”

Willis Davis (Dayton, Ohio), “Anti-Police Brutality Dance Mask #23”

Steve Dodge (Martinsville), “Trouble Ahead”

Fred Doloresco (Fremont), “Winter Shadow and Light”

Daniel Driggs (Frankfort), “Thanksgiving Dinner”

Stephen Edwards (Sheridan), “Slow Summer Stream” and “After a Spring Rain”

Forrest Formsma (Indianapolis), “Fall Glow”

Beth Forst (Noblesville), “Wild Thang”

Joel Fremion (Ossian), “The Artist’s Studio” and “The Patty Porch”

Karen Graeser (Indianapolis), “Harvest Moon”

Sylvia Gray (Westfield), “Carnival”

Linda Gredy (Xenia, Ohio), “Favor for a Thousand Generations”

Randal Gunyon (Fairmount), “Beneath the Surface,” “Beneath the Surface-Second View” and “Beneath the Surface-Third View”

Samuel Hoffman (Fort Wayne), “Art for Sale” and “Creek into River”

Clare Peggy Hollett (Indianapolis), “Spirit’s Cradle,” “Spirit’s Cradle detail 1” and “Spirit’s Cradle detail 2”

Lawrence Hunter (Indianapolis), “Urban Colors”

Matt Hurdle (Fishers), “My Reoccurring Dream”

Debra Huse (Costa Mesa, California), “Timeless Beauty”

John Kelty (Fort Wayne), “Back Way”

Patrick Kluesner (Anderson), “Prussian Blue Heron” and “Great Blue Heron”

Alan Larkin (South Bend), “The Magician”

Wyatt LeGrand (Bloomfield), “George and Avenelle Heaton”

Diane Lehman (Peru), “Looking Through the Lens”

Ronald Leonhardt (Evansville), “Floaters”

Kathy Los-Rathburn (Griffith), “Amoco” and “Refinery”

Peter Lupkin (Fort Wayne), “Portrait of Jeorgia” and “Madame Gautreau”

William Lupkin (Yoder), “Intersections” and “Cut Vessel in Fire Red”

Therese Lynch (West Lafayette), “Lilies in Light” and “Anemones”

Ellen Lyon (Bloomington), “Metallica Tie Dye” and “Pandemic Self-Portrait 1”

A. Cassia Margolis (Indianapolis), “Portrait” and “Reclining Nude”

Jeanne McLeish (Mooresville), “Contemplation” and “The Painter”

Katherine Meade (Santa Rosa Beach, Florida), “Regatta at Sunrise”

Bob Meyers (Indianapolis), “Chicago Rain”

Charles Mundy (Indianapolis), “Raku & Copper with Onions”

Lylanne Musselman (Eaton), “Staring Dementia in the Face”

Pamela Newell (Fishers), “Bouquet in Blue”

Chris Newlund (Columbus), “Sonata”

Kevin O’Brien (Lafayette), “Steverino Fan” and “Hand on Coffee”

Kate Orr (Indianapolis), “Viridian Artemis” and “Champion/When the Storm Passes”

James Patterson (Greenwood), “Forgotten”

Vandra Pentecost (Indianapolis), “Hide & Squeak”

Dianna Porter (Greenwood), “Light Fandango,” “Savannah” and “Skylar in Character”

Robert Pote (Mount Vernon), “Illinois Rural Scene”

Kyle Ragsdale (Indianapolis), “Roco Loco” and “A Grief Observed”

Atossa Rahmanifar (West Lafayette), “Silence is Broken”

Mark Ratzlaff (Bloomington), “Lexington, September Building” and “Anna #5”

Russell Recchion (Tuscon, Arizona), “Harlequin Sage”

Matt Rees (Greencastle), “Orchard Jays”

Patricia Rhoden (Nashville), “Reaching”

Michael Rippey (Douglas, Michigan), “Fresh Snow Indiana Dunes”

Carleen Rivera (Munster), “Paradise Today”

Joe Rohrman (Noblesville), “Le Bateau” and “Stuff”

Brian Russelburg (Plainfield), “Main Street”

Martha Sando (Indianapolis), “Not So Silent Spring” and “Island Power”

Betty Scarpino (Indianapolis), “Finding Center,” “Entwined Energy” and “Entwined Energy 01”

Terri Schultz (Nashville), “Under the Apple Tree,” “Sunshine” and “Kitchen Counter Floral”

Constance Edwards Scopelitis (Indianapolis), “Love Letters to Self #2” and “Love Letters to Self #3”

David Seward (Zionsville), “The Docks at Annecy”

Kerry Shaw (Muncie), “1812 Brave” and “Tombstone Cowboy”

Joshua Shepherd (Union City), “Wouldn’t Call Him Woolly Britches If I Was You”

Donna Shortt (Indianapolis), “Fearless Solitude” and “Moonriser”

Jerry Smith (Crawfordsville), “Heartworn Highway” and “Winter Harmony”

William Smock (Idaville), “Veteran with Dog” and “Turkey Run”

Karen Sonner (Marion), “Puget Sound”

Rita Spalding (Indianapolis), “Yellow Roses” and “Magenta Roses”

Stephanie Spay (Noblesville), “Grasp” and “The Guidance of Zoe”

Arlyne Springer (Noblesville), “Ladies of the Bee”

Curt Stanfield (Rosedale), “Shadow Dance”

Carol StrockWasson (Union City), “Serenade to Simplicity” 

Ginny Takacs (Gary), “Long Lake” and “Birch Grove”

Brian Talbert (Spencer), “Across County Line Road, Late Afternoon”

Stephanie Thomson (Brownsburg), “Sepulchral” 

James Tracy (Deputy), “Stone Head”

Gerald Traicoff (Carmel), “My Morning Song” and “Electric Blues”

Mark Vander Vinne (Porter), “They Paved Paradise” and “Soul Slow Down”

Mary Sue Veerkamp-Schwab (Bloomington), “The Display Case” and “The Light from Behind”

Justin Vining (Indianapolis), “Winter in Irvington”

Mark Waninger (Jamestown), “Royal,” “Rose” and “Raucous”

Patricia Weiss (Huntertown), “Lavatory” and “Late Afternoon Light”

Elizabeth Whipple (Avon), “February Rain”

Cindy Wingo (Carmel), “Aerial Landscape and Color Study” and “Aerial Perspective of SFA”

Carrie Wright (Muncie), “Specimen #19”

Gabriel Yaden (Franklin), “Berries and Cream Ballet”

The judge for this year’s Hoosier Salon was Paula Swaydan Grebel. The California native received her BFA in Figure Drawing and a Minor in Textiles from the California State University of Long Beach. After moving to Wisconsin in the 1990s she has continued studying here and abroad with key perceptual painters. Paula teaches painting and drawing workshops throughout the states, and her work can be found in public and private collections worldwide.

95th Annual Hoosier Salon Exhibition opens August 2, 2019 @hoosiersalon @indianamuseum

July 19, 2019 Leave a comment

state-museum-sign-nov-2011

Indiana State Museum in White River State Park in Indianapolis, Indiana.
AroundIndy.com staff photo, (c) 2011, all rights reserved.

By Renee Bruck
Indiana State Museum

INDIANAPOLIS (July 18, 2019) – Artwork created by 140 Hoosier artists will be featured during the 95th annual Hoosier Salon Patrons Association and Fine Art Galleries exhibition when it returns to the Indiana State Museum beginning Aug. 2, 2019.

The annual competition is Indiana’s longest-running art exhibition and is considered to be the preeminent juried exhibition of Indiana art by Indiana artists. This year, 225 artists applied to the show and entered more than 570 pieces of artwork. Jurors accepted only 161 pieces from 140 artists – including 23 new artists to the exhibition this year.

“The jurors for the Hoosier Art Salon’s 95th Annual Exhibition, Derek Penix and Stephen Hicks, have done a great job identifying work by Indiana artists that is beautiful, compelling and in some instances, satirical and funny,” said Bob Burnett, executive director of the Hoosier Art Salon. “We are very excited to see the show come together.”

While the 161 pieces of art will be on display to the public from Aug. 2 through Oct. 13, many of the pieces will be for sale too. Sales of the artwork begin during an awards and special preview event that begins at 6 p.m. on Aug. 1. Tickets for the preview event can be purchased online prior to the preview event at hoosiersalon.org.

“We are excited to partner once again with the Hoosier Salon to bring this exhibition to the Indiana State Museum,” said Cathy Ferree, president and CEO of the Indiana State Museum and Historic Sites. “This show allows us to provide visitors access to an amazing array of the best art from Indiana artists.”

In addition to the Hoosier Salon exhibition, a show featuring student artwork will be on display at the museum. The Indiana Electric Cooperatives’ Calendar of Student Art Contest features artwork from K-12 students with the first-place winner from each grade featured in the cooperative’s annual wall calendar. The winners of the kids’ show will be announced during an awards ceremony at 2 p.m. on Aug. 2.

The cost of both shows is included with the purchase of general museum admission, which is free for Indiana State Museum and Historic Sites members.

For more information, visit https://indianamuseum.org, or call 317-232-1637.

Eiteljorg Indian Market & Festival, June 22-23, 2019 @eiteljorgmuseum @whiteriverstprk

June 13, 2019 Leave a comment

eiteljorg-indian-market-2019

Image courtesy Eiteljorg Museum. Used with written permission.

By Bryan Corbin
Eiteljorg Museum

One of the region’s best art and cultural experiences returns to downtown Indianapolis the weekend of June 22-23, 2019: the 27th annual Eiteljorg Museum Indian Market and Festival.

More than 120 Native American and First Nations artists from more than 50 cultures across the U.S. and Canada will show and sell their fine art, including jewelry, pottery, beadwork, basketry, paintings, sculptures and more.

The Indian Market and Festival takes place on the beautiful Eiteljorg grounds from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days, and features artists’ booths both outside and inside the museum.

Seasoned art collectors and first-time market-goers alike will appreciate the personal interactions with artists and wide variety of Native fine art available.

Cultural experiences, food and performances are a big part of the weekend; and this year’s event features contemporary and traditional Native musicians, hoop dancing and storytelling. Thousands of visitors attend the market, held every June the weekend after Father’s Day.

“Visitors often say Indian Market and Festival is a wonderful combination of fun and culturally meaningful experiences because it allows them and their families to see Native American art and meet exceptional artists in person,” Eiteljorg President and CEO John Vanausdall said.

“Art collectors appreciate the opportunity to purchase Native art close to home without traveling great distances. Non-collectors get to savor the memorable market and festival atmosphere, and returning artists enjoy the Hoosier hospitality and the opportunity to get reacquainted with old friends and meet new collectors and fans,” he said.

A lineup of Native American performers will appear on the Indian Market and Festival stage June 22 and 23. Two of the four acts also will perform at separate events in the days leading up to the market:

  • World champion hoop dancer and musician Tony Duncan (Apache/Arikara/Hidatsa) and his family of dancers astound crowds with their high-energy moves, and they are returning to the Eiteljorg for performances and hoop-dancing workshops. First, the Duncan family performs at 6 p.m. Thursday, June 20, at River West along the White River as part of A Rising Tide, a free outdoor program with Indy Convergence. Then the Duncan family performs at Indian Market, June 22 and 23, and their appearance is through the support of the Arts Midwest Touring Fund.
  • The award-winning band Son of Hwéeldi plays a blend of rock, soul, blues and world music based on Navajo and Apache histories that they describe as “resistance rock.” The band will first perform at the Eiteljorg at 6 p.m. Wednesday, June 19 during the museum’s free Summer Under The Sails concert series, then will be back June 22-23 to play again during Indian Market.

Music and storytelling is a crowd-pleasing part of Indian Market and Festival. In addition to the Tony Duncan Family and Son of Hwéeldi, the Eiteljorg is pleased to present other entertainers June 22 and 23 during market weekend:

  • An a capella group, Sisterz in Song, featuring a trio of young women vocalists from Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara cultures who perform traditional songs. They perform at 11 a.m. both days.
  • Cultural storyteller Jacque Tahuka Nunez, who performs “Journeys to the Past,” describing the lifestyle of California’s first people, the Acjachemen Nation of Orange County. She performs at noon both days.

For the entertainers’ onstage performance schedule, visit www.eiteljorg.org/indianmarketandfestival/

Adult tickets to the Eiteljorg Indian Market and Festival are $15 at the gate either day. Advance discount tickets are $13 and can be purchased online at www.eiteljorg.org or by calling 317.636.WEST (9378). Youth ages 17 and under are free at Indian Market and Festival. For Eiteljorg Museum members, free admission to the market is available for the individual named on the membership card, but the admission fee will apply for their non-member adult guests.

Tickets to Indian Market and Festival also include museum admission, so plan to experience the museum galleries featuring special exhibitions: A Sense of Beauty: Showcasing the Power and Beauty in Native Art, and Bringing Friends Together: Contemporary Hopi Carvings from the Eagle, Perelman and Rader Collections. Also, see a new traveling exhibition from the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian, For a Love of His People: The Photography of Horace Poolaw, now open at the Eiteljorg.

After a modest start in 1993, the Eiteljorg Indian Market and Festival now is considered one of the nation’s top Native American art markets. Artists are invited to participate through a juried selection and must be members of a federally or state recognized tribe. Many of the artists also submit their artwork for judging as part of the weekend’s juried art competition. Ribbons and cash prizes are awarded to top artists in multiple divisions. Last year, nearly $25,000 in prize money was awarded to artists.

This year’s Indian Market and Festival will be of special interest to the participating artists because for the first time it will feature a $5,000 cash prize for the artist whose art work wins the Margot L. Eccles Best of Show Award in the juried art competition. The prize is supported by The Margot L. Eccles Arts & Culture Fund, a fund of the Central Indiana Community Foundation. The award is named for the late Margot Eccles, a civic leader, philanthropist, art collector, Eiteljorg board member and past chair of Indian Market and Festival, who brought passion, vision and generosity to the annual event.

For the second year in a row, the Eiteljorg will host the Market Morning Breakfast on Saturday morning June 22, for early-bird art collectors who want to meet the artists in a more relaxed setting before the big crowds arrive. Reservations are required to attend the Saturday breakfast; contact csanborn@eiteljorg.com or 317.275.1360 for details.

Popular food vendors will return to the museum grounds during market weekend, including Platero Frybread & Navajo Tacos from New Mexico, as well as Roasted, Toasted and Baked (RTB), Lucky Louie’s Street Food, Bee Coffee Roasters, Menefee Lemonade and Wyliepalooza Ice Cream Emporium’s Wylie Truck. Market-goers also can enjoy the Museum Café and Museum Store. A commemorative Indian Market and Festival T-shirt will be available featuring beautiful art by Gilmore Scott (Diné), Desert Monsoons.

The 27th annual Indian Market & Festival is sponsored by Ice Miller LLP, Arts Midwest, The Margot L. Eccles Arts & Culture Fund and the Cripe Charitable Foundation (which are both funds of the Central Indiana Community Foundation) and Mel and Joan Perelman. The entertainment stage sponsor is the Christel DeHaan Family Foundation. Additional support is provided by the museum’s Mrs. Robert S. Eccles Fund.